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Original Research

Open Access

Quality of Chest Compressions on A Dental Chair -- A Randomized Simulation Trial as Observation in Support of A Procedure Proposal

  • Tomasz Kłosiewicz1
  • Mateusz Puślecki1,2
  • Radosław Zalewski1
  • Michał Mandecki1
  • Ilona Skitek-Adamczak1
  • Maciej Sip1
  • Marek Dąbrowski3
  • Martyna Ratajczak4
  • Przemysław Rachubiński5
  • Bogusz Szczepański5
  • Marek Dorożyński6
  • Beata Czarnecka7
  • Bartłomiej Perek2

1Department of Medical Rescue, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland

2Department of Cardiac Surgery and Transplantology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland

3Chair and Department of Medical Education, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland

4Department of Emergency Medicine, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland

5Faculty of Health Sciences, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland

6Medical Faculty, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznań, Poland

7Chair and Department of Biomaterials and Experimental Dentistry, Poznań, Poland

DOI: 10.22514/sv.2020.16.0073

Online publish date: 14 October 2020

*Corresponding Author(s): Tomasz Kłosiewicz E-mail: klosiewicz.tomek@gmail.com

PDF (528.05 kB)

Abstract

Background: Although medical emergencies among dental patients are not frequent, several factors may provoke sudden cardiac arrests. Early initiation of high-quality chest compressions (CC) is of crucial importance for the safety and effectiveness of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Aims: We aimed to evaluate the quality of chest compressions performed on a dental chair for the proposed procedure in case of cardiac arrest in a dental office. Methods: We designed a prospective, randomized, crossover simulation study. Sixty paramedic students were randomly assigned to the control group, in which resuscitation was performed on the floor (n = 30) or to the experimental group, in which compressions were performed on a dental unit (n = 30). We used a simulator that recorded number of compressions, rate, depth of compressions and chest recoil. Results: There were no significant differences in numbers, rate, depth of chest compressions or in chest recoil between groups. Conclusions: We proved that performing chest compressions on a dental chair might be as effective as on the floor. On this basis, we propose a procedure for safe and efficient performance of CPR in a dental office.

Key words

Chest compressions, Dental equipment, Patient safety, Resuscitation, Simulation training

Cite And Share

Tomasz Kłosiewicz,Mateusz Puślecki,Radosław Zalewski,Michał Mandecki,Ilona Skitek-Adamczak,Maciej Sip,Marek Dąbrowski,Martyna Ratajczak,Przemysław Rachubiński,Bogusz Szczepański,Marek Dorożyński,Beata Czarnecka,Bartłomiej Perek. Quality of Chest Compressions on A Dental Chair -- A Randomized Simulation Trial as Observation in Support of A Procedure Proposal. Signa Vitae. 2020.doi:10.22514/sv.2020.16.0073.

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